In Peru calling for “exemplary punishment” for wildlife traffickers

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Rony Flores Ramirez, from the Tourism College of St. Martín , called exemplary punishment for traffickers of wild animals, a crime committed in the region as something normal.

He noted that according to research by environmental institutions, 47 percent of the species caught and marketed in the international market come from South American forests, particularly in Peru.

In the section of the Tarapoto-Yurimaguas Highway, in just one month was achieved to seize more than 300 wild animals that were going to be sold in markets in the mountains and the coast.

The problem of trafficking of wild animals is mainly in demand, because people buy animals in local markets, streets and other places and the authorities turn a blind eye because the same population creates demand, mainly parrots pihuichos , yellow-headed parrots that mimic the language as well as monkeys and other endangered species.

FROM | www.diariohoy.com.pe

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